Examples of Globalized State Standards

 Vermont Social Studies Standard 6.18 Nature of Conflict: Students analyze the nature of conflicts, how they have been or might be resolved, and how some have shaped the divisions in various times in their local community, Vermont, the United States, and the world.

This standard could be addressed more specifically through the study of the current conflict in Syria.

A formative assessment could be analyzing 2 different news stories about a specific event in the Syrian conflict and how 2 different news organizations present the information. For example, students might compare an American news source like CNN, or use an article from their local or regional newspaper and compare it with an international article about the same event. This would address perspective, bias, how news is communicated, how stories are presented to Americans, etc.

Asia Society Global Competency: Students recognize and understand their own and others perspectives.

Vermont Social Studies Standard 6.13 Concepts of Culture: Students understand the concept of culture, including the cultures of indigenous peoples, in various times in their local community, in the United States, and in various locations worldwide.

This standard could be addressed more specifically through the study of the current conflict in Syria.

Formative Assessment: Using current photographs of Syrian day to day life, students will analyze similarities in Syrian and American culture. What cultural similarities do we have?  What might be happening beyond the borders of the photographs? What questions about life and culture does this raise?

This stems from Oxfam’s Education for Global Citizenship and the Key Element of Values & Attitudes: Empathy & Sense of Common Humanity.

Vermont Social Studies Standard 6.12 Human Rights: Students identify and evaluate the concept of human rights in various times in their local community, in Vermont, in the United States, and in various locations worldwide.

I teach a class, Holocaust & Human Behavior, that  uses the Holocaust as its case study for identity, we vs they, stereotyping, prejudice, racism,  obedience, and genocide.  This is specifically centered on Germany in the 1920s, the rise of Hitler and the Nazis in the 1930s, and the Holocaust under the cover of World War II.  This is a very specific case of human rights violations.

Students could then investigate and compare/contrast the steps that led to the systematic violation of human rights during the Nazi era to that of more recent human rights violations.

Asia Society Global Competency Matrix, student will investigate the world beyond their immediate environment, identify  and weigh relevant evidence from primary and secondary source documents  about a recent human rights violation, analyze and evaluate the situation, and present their findings that demonstrates their understanding of current human rights violations from around the world. 

 

Vermont Social Studies Standard 6.12 Human Rights: Students identify and evaluate the concept of human rights in various times in their local community, in Vermont, in the United States, and in various locations worldwide.

In addition to other assessments at the end of my Global Studies unit on Human Trafficking, students had to select an NGO that works to eradicate trafficking.  After researching the mission and goals and accomplishments of the NGO from its website, students then had to research the effectiveness of the NGO’s efforts through a site like Charity Navigator and determine if the funds raised were used to directly help victims of trafficking. Each student had to evaluate whether or not he/she would donate money to this NGO based on their research and analysis. Students presented their NGO and findings to the class and engaged in a Socratic seminar on what is the best way to help people in need?

Asia Society Global Competency Matrix: Students translate their ideas and findings into appropriate actions to improve conditions.

Vermont Social Studies Standard 6.13 Concepts of Culture: Students understand the concept of culture, including the cultures of indigenous peoples, in various times in their local community, in the United States, and in various locations worldwide.

Why do people eat what they do? This is not a simple question for students to answer as part of my Global Food unit. Using Faith D’Alusio and Peter Menzel’s book Hungry Planet: What the World Eats, students analyze a week’s worth of food for families around the world. Each student receives a color photograph of a family standing with their food for 1 week.  Through detailed examination of the photograph, students brainstorm why their particular family has the food that they have. Each student gives a short presentation of their observations to the class and as a class we begin to examine the role of geography, climate, wealth, cuisine, tradition, multinational food corporations, agriculture, and the larger global food supply. Many questions arise that lead to more indepth student research projects. Those questions include: if there is enough food, why are some people starving? What is Monsanto’s role in the global food supply? How much power do companies like McDonald’s have? Why is Coca-Cola the most recognized global brand?

Asia Society Global Competency Matrix: Student recognize and understand their own and others’ perspectives. Explore and describe how geopolitical differences, as well as access to knowledge, resources, and technology affect the options, choices and quality of life of people around the world.

 

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